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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Jan 21, 2015

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Jan 07, 2015
  • "Motivated by the search for Genghis Khan’s tomb, participants were tasked with finding an…"
    “Motivated by the search for Genghis Khan’s tomb, participants were tasked with finding an archaeological enigma that lacks any historical description of its potential visual appearance. Without a pre-existing reference for validation we turn towards consensus, defined by kernel density estimation, to pool human perception for “out of the ordinary” features across a vast landscape. This consensus served as the training mechanism within a self-evolving feedback loop between a participant and the crowd, essential driving a collective reasoning engine for anomaly detection. The resulting map led a National Geographic expedition to confirm 55 archaeological sites across a vast landscape. A increased ground-truthed accuracy was observed in those participants exposed to the peer feedback loop over those whom worked in isolation, suggesting collective reasoning can emerge within networked groups to outperform the aggregate independent ability of individuals to define the unknown.”

    PLOS ONE: Crowdsourcing the Unknown: The Satellite Search for Genghis Khan

  • "Not only was hula a safe activity that improved functional capacity, participants also regarded its…"
    “Not only was hula a safe activity that improved functional capacity, participants also regarded its significant sociocultural aspects—even for participants who are not Native Hawaiian —as enhancing its value and meaningfulness. Learning the words of well-known Hawaiian songs provided additional long-term cues that encouraged “ownership” of the therapy and acted as practical reminders of the importance of exercise and lifestyle moderation while also offering new spiritual connections to the surrounding social environment.”

    Patient Perspectives on the Hula Empowering Lifestyle Adaptation Study

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Dec 24, 2014

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Tue Dec 23, 2014

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Aug 06, 2014

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Tue Jul 29, 2014

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Cross-stitch patterns are the plushies of the 2010s
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The ten most useful things I have learned from the Internet

…and from people with whom I converse there.

  1. The arrows on the Toronto PATH signs refer to the directions: north is blue, south is red, east is yellow and west is orange. Wouldn’t it be nice if they actually told people this? My mnemonic is silly but in case it helps: blue is a cold colour so it’s north. South = red because of sunburn in southern climes. East = yellow for sunrise; west = orange for sunset.
  2. On most newish cars there’s a cunning little arrow next to the gas thing on the dash which tells you which side the gas cap is on. In the image below, it is on the left. Of course if you have your own car you probably just know which side it’s on but we drive a wide variety of Autoshare and rental cars and this saves a lot of tedious exploration.
  3. A housecleaner is possibly the cheapest and most effective kind of preventative marriage therapy.
  4. Bandelettes.
  5. Proper bra fitting. Key point: the whole adding 5″ to your underbust measurement is bunk. And you have to stoop & swoop. Then you have to throw out all your existing bras which have become suddenly hateful and go buy expensive new ones three cup sizes larger and two band sizes smaller.
  6. Menstrual cups. I always particularly resented that there is GST feminine hygiene products, as they’re a basic necessity and there is no equivalent product than men (and only men) must buy. Before you say “but condoms”– no, condoms are not equivalent; both men and women buy them and they’re also fundamentally optional in a way that feminine hygiene products simply are not. A DivaCup (stupid name, but never mind) can be bought once and used more or less forever — the recommendation to replace it annually is just plain silly. They used to recommend replacing it every ten years but I suppose they weren’t making enough money that way. Mine is twelve years old now and shows no signs of wear whatsoever. Also, they must have let their lawyers near the tips section: actually it’s perfectly fine in the dishwasher (wash it thoroughly first of course!) if it needs an extra-thorough cleaning, and medical-grade silicone is not going to be affected by a bit of vinegar or bleach either. Oh: cut the silly prong off the bottom; it serves no purpose except to irritate one’s labia.
  7. You can do calculations, unit conversions and a lot more right from the Google search bar.
  8. Do Not Feed the Energy Creature. Applies offline too, of course.
  9. If you adopt cats from a reputable rescue organization, someone else has already done the hard work of vetting their personality (and probably getting them spayed/neutered).
  10. Yes, this pastry recipe really is foolproof.
Apropos of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death

Me: I wouldn’t be able to pick Philip Seymour Hoffman out of a lineup. Well, maybe today I could. He’d be the slumpy one with the flies.
Husband: (spits wine)

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Dec 18, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Dec 11, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Nov 27, 2013
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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Thu Nov 07, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Mon Sep 09, 2013
  • School is no Place for a Reader « Canadian Notes & Queries:

    “Sequential levelled readers” are making their punctual way to the house in the backpack, one every week. The teacher leans forward and says, mysteriously, “There is a difference between decoding and comprehension. Perhaps she is decoding that book, but she isn’t comprehending it.” Raised fingers twitch around his words.

Shout out to the children’s librarians at Brentwood library who made many excellent book suggestions and eventually gently told me I might do better in the adult section.

And another shout out to my parents, who never limited my reading but who offered to read and discuss anything I wanted them to. I’m following their excellent example on this with M.

It’s good to read things that challenge, that you might not absolutely understand. Sometimes you need to let the language wash over you, take from it what you can, and come back some years later. How else can we learn? How else can we learn elegance?

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That’s about right — R.I.P. summer…

Lesson1863

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Aug 14, 2013
  • Tech is killing childhood – Salon.com
    Tech is killing childhood – Salon.com:

    Some of the worst, most passive writing I’ve yet seen on this topic. She makes it sound like parents can’t do a single thing to put boundaries around technology use.

    “I tell you, it feels overwhelming,” says a mother who used to look forward to the drive time as talk time but has seen it devolve into a futile exercise in screen censorship. “All of a sudden I’m driving and hear them in the backseat—they’re looking at YouTube and I think, What the heck? I mean, how much screening and censoring can a parent do?”

    Well, for a start, you can not take the screen into the car. Also you can not provide your children with Internet access you can’t supervise. I mean really, people. 

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Jun 12, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Apr 24, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Apr 10, 2013

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Neat Stuff from Elsewhere Wed Feb 06, 2013

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